Article archive for 1998 – Page 3

Thursday, October 1, 1998

Massively distributed computing using computing fabrics

Never let it be said that the editors at DominoPower don’t give you the juicy stuff. This one’s hard-core computer architecture for the serious junky. In his fascinating article, Editor-in-Chief (and former professor of computer science) David Gewirtz gives you a tantalizing preview of the future of how vast networks of processors will connect.

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

Linking Domino to Excel via XML

Sometimes, it’s tough figuring out which article is the Top Dog, the Big Kahuna, the Godzilla of articles. Which article will win the coveted prize of being the DominoPower Spotlight, to be featured on DominoPower’s cover? This time, there was no question. All our articles are exceptional. But this article, by new author Jeffrey R. Burrows, is the best of the best. It’s useful, it’s timely, and it’s hot. In his article Jeffrey links two important applications, Domino and Excel, using the hottest new technology on the Net: XML. This is the one they’ll be discussing around the water cooler tomorrow.

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

The perils of online ordering

Here’s public relations lesson 101: never piss off an Editor-in-Chief with hundreds of thousands of readers. He’s always looking for great ideas for editorials and if you’ve managed to tick him off in a way he can use in an article, your company has just become the object lesson of the month. The month, the twin targets of David’s ire are 1-800-Flowers and the Audio Book Club. He tried being an online consumer with both. Both screwed up big time, giving him great grist for the mill. The lesson: how weaknesses in your Web solution are no justification for lousy customer service. David also aims his attention at Amazon.com. His only complaint: they’re way, way too easy to work with and, therefore, make it way, way too easy to buy way, way too much.

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

Log analysis programs compared

In this issue, Tony Patton continues his immensely popular series on Web site log analysis. After all, knowing who’s visiting your site may be the lifeblood of many Web-based businesses. In this DominoPower Product Shootout, James runs three log analysis products (Dominator, WebTrends Suite for Lotus Domino, and Domino Log Analyzer) through the ringer. Which one’s best for you? Read the article and find out.

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

Cascading custom applications on your Domino server

Not to be outdone by the new kid on the block, Senior Technology Editor Richard Echeandia weighs in with a beefy tutorial on cascading applications. Cascading address books are particularly helpful because they reduce mail-addressing problems for your end-user community. It also gives you more time because, while you probably want to have your primary address book locked down security wise, the cascaded address books can be more open for editing by anyone within your organization. Richard scores the knockout punch by showing you how to make your new or existing Notes application databases work like Public Address Books, so that they can be cascaded on the Domino server or your remote Notes workstations. We have a winnah!

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

Fun with NotesDesign

Our newly minted News Editor, Heather McDaniel, has a tough challenge each month. She helps pick the DominoPower Site of the Month. The pressure’s enormous when choosing among the very best. But Heather’s tough. She’s not willing to be wooed by mere flowers or cookies (although it’s rumored that visits to Toys R Us inspire an amazing lack of self-control). No, the only thing that’ll catch this die-hard editor’s eye is quality (ok, so a new car might also work). And so, if you want to see why NotesDesign won the award, you’ll have to read the article. And please: no more cookies.

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Thursday, October 1, 1998

Keep ’em coming back for more

So you’ve spent all this time building a Domino-based Web site. And you’ve spent all this money on hardware, software, and bandwidth. Is it a good investment or money flushed down the circular Web server? No question, if you have lots of visitors and you’re making money, it’s a win. The key is not just getting them to visit your site once — it’s turning them into repeat visitors and, possibly, repeat customers. If you want your whole Web investment to pan out, read this article to learn how to keep ’em coming back for more.

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Tuesday, September 1, 1998

Email, privacy and the workplace

As a Notes or Domino administrator, you’re usually concerned with the hands-on aspects of email administration. Is the system configured correctly? Can this user get that attachment? And so on. But there are bigger issues you need to understand as well. In particular, you need to understand, as both an employee and as a representative of management, privacy issues as they relate to email. In this informative introductory article, Victor Woodward provides a gentle introduction to the legal implications of email, privacy, and the workplace.

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Tuesday, September 1, 1998

How I learned to stop worrying and love the SMTP MTA

It’s not Dr. Strangelove, but sometimes configuring the various Domino gateways can often make you feel a bit crazy. In this excellent and critically important article, Jon Johnston takes us deeply inside the SMTP Message Transfer Agent (MTA) and shows us some incredibly valuable features you can use in your war against spammers. By simply tweaking a few settings in the NOTES.INI file, you can shoot down that barrage of unsolicited and unwelcome email messages sent by unscrupulous spammers. Armed with this powerful article, you can turn Notes, Domino and the SMTP MTA into your own Patriot missile battery and prevent unsolicited messages from ever landing in your users’ email boxes. Go get ’em, General!

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Tuesday, September 1, 1998

Understanding log entries in your web log

Last month, Tony Patton introduced you to some basic web traffic analysis features of Domino. This month, he takes you deep into the gory heart of the log file, so you can understand exactly what’s recorded. This is hard-core stuff. If you run a web site and need to know what’s going on, who’s visiting, and, fundamentally, how valuable your site is commercially, you’ll need to read and learn from this article.

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